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. in june of 2009, fbi directer acknowledged the challenge facing the bureau stating, "it is not sufficient for us as an organization to respond to a terrorist attack after it has occurred. it is important for us as an organization to develop the intelligence to anticipate the terrorist attack developing intelligence, developing facts. and the past we looked at collecting facts for the courtroom. we now have to think of ourselves as gathering facts painting a picture of a particular threat understanding the risk and moving to reduce that risk. and i couldn't agree more with the directer's statement. and then on november 5, 2009, a gunman walked in the soldier readiness center at fort hood, texas and shouted the jihaddic term. and opened fire on unarmed soldiers and civilians. he killed 13 and wounded 43 42 others. was the most horrific terrorist attack on the u.s. soil since 9/11. today we will exam the facts of the fort hood case as we know them to better understand how these facts that seem so obviously alarming now were so missed by seasoned professionals and to understand how the fbi
, two of the three organizations testifying today did not exist. and the third, the f.b.i., was a very different organization than it is today. focused on domestic crime as it had been for quite a while. obviously in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on america of 9/11, 2001, congress and the executive branch created the department of homeland security and then pursuant to the 9/11 commission recommendation created the national counterterrorism center. the f.b.i. essentially recreated itself into a first rate domestic counterterrorism intelligence agency. in addition to carrying out all its other responsibilities. in his absence we should thank director mueller for what i think is an extraordinary job he's done in overseeing this historic transformation and to thank the two of you, secretary napolitano, and director olsen, for what you have done together these changes represent the most significant reforms of america's national security organizations since the 1940's, at the beginning of the cold war. it's not coincidental since after 9/11 we understood we were facing a very diffe
came during a hearing on u.s. security threats. janet napolitano and the fbi associate director also testified. this is an hour and 50 minutes. >> the hearing will come to order. good morning to all. this is our annual, our committee's annual home lapd threat assessment hearing -- homeland threat assessment hearing. i want to welcome back janet napolitano, secretary of department of homeland security, and matt olsen, and the associate deputy director, kevin perkins, who is standing in for director bob mueller today. the director had to undergo unexpected surgery resulting from complications associated with recent dental treatment. he's unable to join us today. but we welcome mr. perkins in his stead. we with confidence we extend best regards to the director for a speedy recovery. this will be the final time that i have the privilege of chairing this annual hearing, so i want to use this opportunity to thank each of you for your leadership in our nation's homeland security and counterterrorism efforts through you to thank those who work with you in each of your departments or agencies
, is that on september 11, 2001, two of the three organizations testifying today did not exist. and the third, the f.b.i., was a very different organization than it is today. focused on domestic crime as it had been for quite a while. obviously in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks on america of 9/11, 2001, congress and the executive branch created the department of homeland security and then pursuant to the 9/11 commission recommendation created the national counterterrorism center. the f.b.i. essentially recreated itself into a first rate domestic counterterrorism intelligence agency. in addition to carrying out all its other responsibilities. in his absence we should thank director mueller for what i think is an extraordinary job he's done in overseeing this historic transformation and to thank the two of you, secretary napolitano, and director olsen, for what you have done together these changes represent the most significant reforms of america's national security organizations since the 1940's, at the beginning of the cold war. sinceot coincidental after 9/11 we understood we were facing a very
that was not enough to warrant an investigation. there was nothing the fbi could point to which would single him out for special investigation or attention. was this an intelligence failure in wisconsin? >do you think there could have been things done to prevent this attack that were not done? >> i think the fbi late at where the problem was. they're really good at investigating after the fact, after things happen, but we had a delicate balance between people's constitutional right to assemble and express their speech, however weil, but we also have to be board cleaning and look at ideologies that have long histories of -- forward- looking and the ideologies that have long histories of spawning violence. i'm not talking about doing covert operations and people with extremist police, but i think it is important we have an overt monitoring police system on what is causing people to act of violence may. was this an intelligence failure? i do not think it is. but one thing the department of homeland security and the fbi could have done -- where was the warning the that sikhs and muslims have been victim
units of marines fan out to these countries, fbi agents are being sent to libya to investigate the murder of the american ambassador there and three other americans were killed. the fbi. we think of the fbi as a domestic agency, it's the fbi that's part of the u.s. government that has the authority to investigate deaths of americans in all other parts of the world. fbi did it in the embassy bombings in kenya, in tanzania in 1998, and the "uss cole" bombing in 2000 and mumbai bombings in india in 2008 and now the fbi is investigating in libya or at least we're told they are on their way. the fbi being dispatched to libya is yet another reminder what happened in libya appears to be a different kettle of fish than what is happening at all the other embassies and u.s. sites around the world today. the attack that killed the u.s. ambassador in libya appears to have been a coordinated, military-style assault by well-armed men who arrived at the scene quite separately from any civilian protest. given the militant groups known to operate in the area of benghazi and the types of attacks
fbi agent echoed that sentiment. >> the countries of middle east believe there is a disengagement policy by the united states and that lack of leadership there or at least clarity on what our position is causing problems. i, if we all decide to rally around the video as the problem we're going to make a serious mistake and we're going to make i think diplomatic mistakes as we move forward if we think that is the only reason people are showing up at our embassy to conduct acts violence. bill: the romney campaign says the obama administration is failing to throughout that part of the world. heather: there is more trouble brewing between israel and iran as a nightmare scenario could be coming close to reality. prime minister benjamin netanyahu says the iran will be the on the brink of nuclear capabilities in just six months. he use ad metaphor to describe the new emergency and claims that iran is developing nuclear power for peaceful purposes. listen to this. >> denies the holocaust, promises to wipe out israel and engages in terror throughout the world. like timothy mack say walking
americans. the fbi has been telling us in the past couple days, their investigation is underway and apparently still underway outside of libya. tensions and security situation is still too difficult in there to put a full team of fbi investigators on the ground according to reports. they're closed about this. what we can confirm. u.s. navy destroyers in the air and aerial drones and they're doing everything they can to try to begin this investigation. what is a very difficult and dangerous landscape. back to you. >> alisyn: greg palkot. thank you so much for that update. let's talk about the military situation in terms of what the security was in the consulate in benghazi. whether or not it was accurate. and catherine herridge has published an article in foxnews.com where she outlined all of the attacks leading up to tuesday at that should have been red flags and meant we were beefing up our security on september 11th. >> as a panoply of attacks, june 6th an ied thrown at the perimeter of the consulate in benghazi. on the 11th the british motorcade came under attack by an rpg. o
. "helping." f.b.i. and others are on the ground in the early stages of the investigation. top priority here? find out whether the strike on the consulate was a planned assault by terrorists rather than a rampageing mob angry other antimuslim video. catherine is in washington, dc, first on the reported arrests. >> this afternoon, the intelligence community is trying to knock down the report. this question was put to the state department. i saw the press reports before i came down. i was not able to confirm them. obviously, it would be a good thing if we are moving forward on this. >> the state department confirmed the investigation in benghazi at consulate is led by the libyan authorities with f.b.i. agents on the ground because american citizens are dead. at least publicly the state department remains cautious when it comes to assigning blame. fox is told that two groups are part of the universe of suspects in the libyan attacks affiliated with al qaeda, the affiliate in north africa. one is the lifg, the libyan islamic fighting group banned under qadaffi and the other is a group, too, that
to justice. >> shep: the f.b.i. now joining the hunt for the gunmen who stormed the u.s. consulate and killed the american ambassador and others. plus, he traveled to the heavens and took the dreams of an entire nation along for the ride. >> faith looked down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first to venture to another world. >> shep: tonight remembering neil armstrong, our first man on the moon. first from fox this thursday night, the crisis in the middle east. arrests in ex with the attack on the u.s. consulate and the murder of our ambassador and others. the arrest of suspects may be a meaningful development, we'll see. it could be just a symbolic gesture by the libyans in which they round up the usual suspects and report their conducting interviews. it won't be the first time. there is no way to know whether they have a motive and what it is. here is what we know. investigators in the united states and libya say the astack on the consulate was likely an act of terror and likely timed to mark the 9-11 terrorist attacks. the libyans say it was a two-part operation. investigators a
question to kimberly. a question that catherine herridge on fox news has been asking over and over is the f.b.i. going there? why haven't they arrived yet? is it because it's unsafe? what is the other reason if you are the administration you want the f.b.i. investigating this? >> kimberly: this is their dog and pony show. instead of handling this through the military division they will handle it as a law enforcement problem. send the f.b.i. there. that means if they get anybody they want to question and integait, they will go, here is a happy meal. we'll bring you back and try you here. the wrong way to approach this situation. >> dana: it has happened before. at fort hood. >> kimberly: it has happened before. we've seen the epeck fail by the administration and holder of department of injustice. they don't know how to manage this. they are lacking. they are not respected in the middle east. now seeing weakened position internationally. if you look in the the violence erupting in different spots if this was president bush in the past administration, calls for him to be thrown out of office. >> d
for two days. he was convicted in 2009 for bank fraud. we're told the fbi has contacted him because of possible threats against him. we're told he's not under investigation right now. >> brian, thanks very much. brian todd working this story. less than two years ago we watched as these kinds of protests spread across north africa and the middle east. protesters fighting to overthrow dictators and regimes. fast forward to today. we're seeing these same countries erupt in violence anti-american protests. let's bring in bobby gauche, editor at large for "time" magazine. he wrote this week's cover story "the agents of outrage," an excellent article, bobby. thanks very much. let me read a line from your article. the arab spring replaced the harsh order of hated dictators with a flowering of neophyte democracies. but these governments with weak mandates evershifting loyalties and poor security forces have made the region a more chaotic and unstable place, a place more susceptible than ever to rogue provocateurs fo meanting violent upheavals usually in the name of faith. the bottom line qu
that are on the ground in libya. there is one u.s. navy destroyer off of the coast and another coming there, too and f.b.i. agents and as well a stepped up drone surveillance. we are talking about a terror manhunt in libya. in addition to the motivator of that film made in the u.s., it could be a complex organization to take out u.s. officials with an al-qaida link. we are looking at the video we have seen coming from the who is citing that the al-qaida number two was killed by the u.s. and called on action from the u.s.. a complex and fluid situation, back to you. >> gretchen: thank you. >> brian: how does the united states respond? former director of national intelience who worked in the worst situation . ambassador, welcome. what is our best next step first of course in libya? >> let mow say that chris stevens, we lost an exemptary diplomat. he was the kind of example of expeditionary diplomacy that characterized our hot spots . we will mourn his loss and miss him greatly. as far as the next step, we have to wait this situation out a bit and at least get past the friday prayers tomorrow and see how tha
. the situation in cairo changing hour to hour. ian lee live in cairo, thank you. >>> the fbi is expected to arrive in libya today to begin investigating the attack that killed four americans. cnn intelligence correspondent suzanne kelly joins us now from washington with the latest information about what the u.s. intelligence agencies knew and when they knew t.suzanne, what do you know? >> reporter: >> right, randi. cnn found out from a u.s. int intelligence source there was a cable sent warning about the existence of this anti-muslim film on the internet and also warning that they had seen an uptick in the number of people who had been clicking on the link and watching the film. they sent a cable from cairo warning them that that was out there. however, there was no specific warning attached that an attack was imminent. a couple of things intelligence did know going into this. there are well-equipped groups already in place in benghazi. a lot of al qaeda sympathizers there as well, these pockets of al qaeda sympathizers. knowledge of this film, when you pull the pieces together, you get
and trips to libya to protect its buildings, as well as fbi agents to investigate the killing of its ambassador and three others on tuesday. christopher stevens was a popular envoy. this is the ransacked consulate where he was killed. flags at american embassies around the world are flying at half mast, while an actor who was in the low-budget film said she had no idea how it would be used. >> we were filming a film that was in an era of 2000 years ago called "desert warriors." what he did to us was wrong, and perhaps we can all learn a lot from this. i don't know what i am going to do. >> and other protests have spread to iraq, where almost a decade ago, the delicate transition from dictatorship to democracy in the middle east was meant to have begun. >> we demand that the iraqi government close the american embassy. america must apologize to our parts of the islamic world. >> candle lit tributes in washington for the murder diplomats, with the unknown -- how much will their debts and the badly made film be a turning point in the arab spring? >> tensions are certainly high. we bring
hoffa. one of the persistent questions. why is this shed and driveway? >> the f.b.i. has this case. of course, they have been searching for years for jimmy hoffa's body. it came up where somebody complained they saw or know of a body that was buried at that location. he gave a couple of names that were tied in with jimmy hoffa at the time when he disappeared. that was the reason for the search. either they had to search for a body or jimmy hoffa's body. that is the reason for this. >> heather: this location it's about 30 miles west of where he was last seen. you mentioned those names. they are associated with the house itself? >> i think they are. one of them -- i'm not sure if they are relatives or not. the person who made that allegation the f.b.i., i think those names were connected in some way. one of those names are probably the prime suspect of disappearance of jimmy hoffa. >> heather: what are investigators looking for in these soil samples. what do they hope to find? >> anything they can find. any kind of bone, body, dna anything to prove there is a body there. does the f.b
the stove pipes are down, intelligence is red teamed, the fbi now has a national security branch, staffed by 10,000 people. i mean how could it be that people were learning how to fly planes and not land. these were the kinds of things they would look out for. and as bob mueller said in open session to us, we've had 20 attempts at the last year and every one of them has been stopped. i think that's good news. so we have learned. we have a counterterrorism center that specializes now in threats to the homeland. we have a director of national intelligence to provide coordination over the 16 different intelligence agencies. no longer are they their own spheres, they're part of a network. there have been changes and we have learned hard lessons. >> how important is the killing yesterday in yemen of the second in command al qaeda's second in command, al shirry. >> that hasn't been confirmed to the best of my knowledge. i don't know whether he is dead or not. but if he is, it's certain lay positive thing. over half of the al qaeda leadership has been taken out. the problem is, that they're repl
back and confirmed what the fbi report said from earlier that year, which had been kind of pushed under. we got lucky in that times square bombing. we solved that one. thank god the bomb did not off. but you know, we have had 10,000 people die in that war. thank god we got osama bin laden and it was a police action. thank you so much. host: how should we mark the day? last night on facebook we ask all of you to comment on how america has changed in the 11 years. host: you can put your comments on facebook about how we should mark this day or how america has changed. here is "the boston globe" this morning. "a quieter 9/11, after an intense anniversary last year, families welcome a setback." "for some, it means scaling back." "some communities have decided to scale back, prompted by a growing feeling that it may be time to move on. nearly every ceremony will be smaller this year, even after the epicenter of the attacks has stripped the ceremony of its politicians who have in the past read literary or religious policies. instead, bagpipers and a huge chorus will provide the music. george
the attack. he said, get the fbi director on the phone. fortunately the instructions had been given to get the fbi director on the phone before he walked in, so we could say, he is right here, mr. president. he then talked to the vice president and talked to governor pataki and other leaders. he worked on remarks for the american people that he delivered before an audience of 600 people. he thought he was there talking about leaving no child left behind and education and said he was going back to washington, d.c. i knew he wasn't going back to washington ton d.c. he and i had quite an argument because he wanted to go back toe washington. see set service and pilot of the air force one didn't want to go back until we knew what happened. we went to louisiana. landed there. took some people off air force one. we flew to omaha, nebraska, strategic air command center and went down into a deep bunker. the whole time the president was deliberate, decisive, strong leader. he did not want to be disruptive to the responsibilities that were being met by the people getting planes safely on the ground a
the middle-east-- >> reporter: and the latest informs on the fbi is that they have been in libya for almost a week, but they have yet to reach the actual site of the attack in benghazi and it would be safe to say that nearly 2 weeks after that assault, that the crime scene, if you want to call it that, is contaminated for any future prosecution. >> jamie: i hadn't read that. that's very disturbing because they truly want to get answers. i am curious, though, whether or not we need the cooperation of other governments who must -- because they want to protect their people in libya and other countries -- do we need their cooperation to get real answers? >> reporter: well, i think we need the cooperation of governments outside of libya in the longer term, on a cum of fronts. one, if we have intel jeps that shows any kind of direction of this assault from outside of libya, and second, based on my reporting so far, i think we are definitely going to find that there were these so-called foreign fighters involved in this attack, people from algeria, tunisia and maybe as far as pakistan. so if the p
it on "democracy now!" >> i think we have to ask if the security establishment did not want this bill and the fbi director actually goes to congress and says publicly they don't want it, why did it pass? what pushed it through? i think without question the corporate elite understand things certainly economically are about to get much worse, and i think they're worried about the occupy movement expanding. i think in the end, and this is a position, they don't trust the police to protect them and they want able to call in the army. >> that is chris hedges. marcy wheeler? >> he has made a compelling argument. the judge said because he is the reporting with terrorists, he might be at risk. jeremy scahill has also talked about how journalists in yemen, for example, have been held on obama's order for reporting closely from al qaeda. i think chris has a legitimate concern. the judge and a compelling argument. what was done about this case is a hearing in march when the government came before her and the judge said, can you tell me whether any of these plaintiffs would be held under the ndaa? they're li
, particularly in the benghazi area. >> reporter: the fbi is leading the investigation. their team now on the ground in libya responsible for collecting the evidence intended to help whittle down that suspect list. >> we are conducting interviews, gathering evidence and trying to sort out the facts working with our partners both from a criminal standpoint as well as in the intelligence community to try to determine exactly what took place on the ground that evening. >> reporter: there are significant challenges facing u.s. investigators and the intelligence community. for one, getting a level of granularity that will allow them to identify individuals and their associations with various groups. another challenge, sifting through whatever information or evidence was left behind at a crime scene that was never really secured. all against a backdrop of concern for the investigators' safety. >> the fbi has a track record of being able to go into these places that are volatile and be able to put together a criminal case. we've done it in yemen with the coal bombing. we did it in east africa
to make the cuts to farm subsidies a bit bigger than the cuts to, say, the fbi. $1.2 trillion in defhich we pre much don't make a single choice about what is and is not worth funding. that administration conference call today was happening because the administration by law had to release this almost 400-page document. it was very, very long. telling us exactly where these sequestered cuts would fall. their bottom line from the text of their report, quote, education grants to state and local school districts supporting smaller classes would get cut. after-school programs and children with disabilities would suffer. the number of federal bureau of investigation agents, custom and border patrol agents, correctional officers and federal prosecutors would be slashed. the federal aviation administration's ability to oversee and manage a nation's airspace and air traffic control would be reduced. hope you don't have to fly anywhere. the department of agriculture'sesagriculture's e efforts would be curtailed. hope you don't have to eat anything. environmental protection aswrgc would be degraded.
that an investigation is underway. >> the libyans are leading an investigation. we have our own f.b.i. investigation, we also have close f.b.i. and libyan cooperation as we both pursue these, but i'm not going to get into the back and forth of who is arrested, what we think, what we know about any of this. >> reporter: meanwhile reaction to this anti-is film is complicating the end game in afghanistan with attacks against nato troops there being blamed on the film. u.s. officials have suspended joint operations withafter beg with afghan prop patrols and that complicates with call by 2018. martha: it's difficult to get a handle on exactly what took place. a former c.i.a. covert operations officer joins us with his analysis with the intel skwhrepbs gatherethe inch with the intelligence gathered so far. bill: they told fox's sean hannity that the white house is hiding from reality. >> they don't want to admit it's a terrorist attack, his policies have failed. >> they he think this is weaker and just this afternoon we hear that the doj is now going to be investigating this incident. sean, these guys are --
to the state department that there were increasing security concerns in benghazi? the fbi says it is too dangerous to be in benghazi, which is why none of them are there now. is that because the situation has worsened, or was it always too dangerous? >> as we determine the details of what took place there and how that attack took place, it became clear that there were terrorists who had planned that attack. that is when i came to that conclusion. as to who was involved, what specific groups were involved, i think the investigation that is ongoing hopefully will determine that. >> about a day after? >> it took a while to get some feedback as to what exactly happened at that location. >> there was a threat intelligence reporting back -- eight to read -- there was a thread of intelligence reporting that groups were seeking to coalesce, but there was not anything specific, and certainly not anything specific to the consulate that i am aware of. as far as the risks of the fbi reported, you really would have to ask them why they made that determination. >> did you make the state department awa
for operations at our consulate in benghazi. as the fbi refines its search there are new questions as to what egyptian security forces were doing while the attack on the egyptian embassy was in motion and what the libyans were doing wet attack there was taking place. libyan officials say u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and sean smith were killed in the first attack in benghazi. a navy seal was killed and 30 other people were wounded. >> reporter: within the last hour hour the state department confirming the investigation is being led with by libyan authorities. the state department remains cautious wit comes to assigning blame. >> as we said yesterday when we were on background, we are very cautious withdrawing any conclusions with regard to who the perpetrators were, what their motivations were, whether it was premeditated. whether they had extern contacts, whether there was any link until we have a chance to investigate. report report attacks benghazi are described by the head of the house intelligence committee as a premeditated attack. ansar al-sharia wants to restrict adherence to sh
a drill agencies like homeland security, fbi, border patrol is using drugs on the southern and northern border. they've been giving out to companies that make the drones. permits have been issued to some universities that are working with the pentagon and they've been given to about 30 police departments to experiment with drugs. well, the drug manufacturers have been very upset with the faa and send the, this is a growth industry. we need a market. we need to solve these drones at home. but speed up this process. so what do they do? they formed their own lobby group in the new piece of legislation and they got their own members of congress to form a drone caucus. now think about all the things you can have a caucus about to help schoolchildren, to feed the homeless. i mean, a million things. there's a group of 58 congresspeople do think it's their duty elected by we the people to go into congress and address what they say is the urgent need to see more of these unmanned vehicles being used both overseas and here in the united states. so they passed a piece of legislation on february 14
for fbi, not cia. okay? this is a job for the michigan state police, not the department of defense. okay. by the way, by and large most of the information we knew, okay, we knew about umar farouk abdulmutallab, the guy coming into detroit was all foreign derived. i think it was mistake to mirandize him in 50 minutes because our base of him is foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was, enemy combatant, nation at war, deal with it that way. on the other hand if someone is discovered and prevented in an attack in the united states by the fbi the roots of that information are law enforcement derived. the going in position is we ought to treat this as a law enforcement problem and enter this into the american court system. i suppose if we stayed her long enough we could think of exceptions but in broad measure my sense is that is how we should deal with it. i hope made it worth your while coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than you had when you came in. that was my intent. and thank you very much for the opportunity. and, go air force. [applause]
circumstances. this is a job for the fbi, not the cia. by the way, by and large, most of the information that we knew, we knew it about the guy coming in to try, and it was derived from foreign. our base of knowledge of him was foreign intelligence. to me the right entry point was enemy combatant, n.h. -- agent of war, deal with it that way. the roots of the information are that we should treat this as a law enforcement problem. in broad measure, my sense is that that is how we should do with it. thank you all for coming here this afternoon. i hope you have left with more questions than it had and you came in. that was my intent. they you for giving me the opportunity. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> i watch c-span because i feel it is important to be knowledgeable about what is going on in the world and i feel that c-span gives the most information on what is going on in a certain suspect -- subject, while lots of television is not do that. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979. drop
in the shooting five weeks ago. the motive is still not clear. may be a while before authorities and fbi release findings of their investigation. officer murray, we can tell you happily is recovering at home. his protective vest, jon, stopping three of the rounds page fired at him, very likely saving that officer's life. jon: what a hero. rick folbaum, thank you. jenna: new concerns today about how close iran is getting to a nuclear weapon. as we continue to get reports that iran is both keeping its uranium production low, around the level for civilian use for energy use, but in the meantime, ramping up ability to quickly turn the material into a nuclear weapon. now israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu is calling out the united states not willing to draw a red line as when we will act. >> the world tells israel wait, there is still time. i say, wait for what? wait until when. those international community who refuse to put red lines before iran don't have a moral right to place a red red light before israel. jenna: mike baker, former cia covert operations officer. security firm diligence ll
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)

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